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Press Release

AACN Applauds New International Study that Confirms Strong Link Between Nursing Education and Patient Outcomes

Breaking research shows that patient mortality rates are lower in hospitals with a higher percentage of baccalaureate-prepared nurses

WASHINGTON, D.C., February 25, 2014 – The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) applauds new research published today in The Lancet, which shows that patients experiencing complications after surgery are more likely to live if treated in hospitals with adequate nurse staffing levels and higher numbers of nurses prepared at the baccalaureate degree level. Following a review of more than 420,000 patient records in 300 hospitals spanning nine European countries, the study authors found that a 10% increase in the proportion of nurses holding a bachelor’s degree in an acute care setting is associated with a 7% decrease in the risk of death in discharged patients following common surgeries, such as knee replacements, appendectomies, and vascular procedures.

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ABSTRACT

Background
Austerity measures and health-system redesign to minimise hospital expenditures risk adversely affecting patient outcomes. The RN4CAST study was designed to inform decision making about nursing, one of the largest components of hospital operating expenses. We aimed to assess whether differences in patient to nurse ratios and nurses' educational qualifications in nine of the 12 RN4CAST countries with similar patient discharge data were associated with variation in hospital mortality after common surgical procedures.

Methods
For this observational study, we obtained discharge data for 422 730 patients aged 50 years or older who underwent common surgeries in 300 hospitals in nine European countries. Administrative data were coded with a standard protocol (variants of the ninth or tenth versions of the International Classification of Diseases) to estimate 30 day in-hospital mortality by use of risk adjustment measures including age, sex, admission type, 43 dummy variables suggesting surgery type, and 17 dummy variables suggesting comorbidities present at admission. Surveys of 26 516 nurses practising in study hospitals were used to measure nurse staffing and nurse education. We used generalised estimating equations to assess the effects of nursing factors on the likelihood of surgical patients dying within 30 days of admission, before and after adjusting for other hospital and patient characteristics.

Findings
An increase in a nurses' workload by one patient increased the likelihood of an inpatient dying within 30 days of admission by 7% (odds ratio 1·068, 95% CI 1·031—1·106), and every 10% increase in bachelor's degree nurses was associated with a decrease in this likelihood by 7% (0·929, 0·886—0·973). These associations imply that patients in hospitals in which 60% of nurses had bachelor's degrees and nurses cared for an average of six patients would have almost 30% lower mortality than patients in hospitals in which only 30% of nurses had bachelor's degrees and nurses cared for an average of eight patients.

Interpretation
Nurse staffing cuts to save money might adversely affect patient outcomes. An increased emphasis on bachelor's education for nurses could reduce preventable hospital deaths.

Attached resources:

Link leads to: http://www.aacn.nche.edu/news/articles/2014/international-study

Link leads to: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2813%2962631-8/abstract

Link leads to: http://www.aacn.nche.edu/media-relations/fact-sheets/impact-of-education

Link leads to: http://www.aacn.nche.edu/media-relations/fact-sheets/nursing-workforce

 
Bistra Zheleva
Replied at 11:50 PM, 27 Feb 2014

Patricia Hickey at Boston Children's Hospital has been studying this as well for a while but for children's hospitals - http://vectorblog.org/2013/11/in-the-icu-nurse-experience-and-education-can-m...

The links are clear, I wish more hospital administrators saw them...

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