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Research on HIV Prevention with Positive Interventions

Added on 22 Jul 2010
Last updated on 14 Jun 2011

Authors: By Anat Rosenthal, PhD; Reviewed by Sophie Beauvais and Peter Ehrenkranz, MD

In its Living 2008: The Positive Leadership Summit Report, the Global Network of People living with HIV: GNP+ defines positive prevention (PP) as “an approach to prevention that seeks to increase the psychosocial well-being of people living with HIV (PLHIV) and encourage solidarity amongst and for PLHIV” and has been recommended by UNAIDS (the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS) since 2005.

In this discussion, members exchange information about new and ongoing studies on PP interventions in naïve HIV positive populations for risk reduction (sexual, PMTCT, disclosure, HIV testing, and discordant partners or with unknown HIV status) in South Africa, Uganda, Rwanda, Canada and the U.S.A

Key Points

  • To members’ knowledge, no randomized controlled trials (RCT) on positive interventions have been conducted yet.
  • Positive prevention interventions are difficult to study with RCT as the positive patient is the intervention, but the sexual contact is the outcome (thus various other factors affect risk).
  • Cohorts in discordant couples have been reported from both Uganda and Rwanda indicating thresholds for viral load and transmission risks.
  • Vancouver University has a cohort of discordant couples in Jinja, Uganda.

Key References

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Download: 12_02_10_Research_HIV_Prev_Positive_Interventions.pdf (42.4 KB)