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Good practices in the prevention and care of tuberculosis and drug-resistant tuberculosis in correctional facilities (2018)

By Masoud Dara, MD Moderator | 24 Jan, 2018

Dear colleagues,

Please find a recent publication of WHO Regional Office for Europe, with thanks to inputs of many of you.

"Tuberculosis (TB), and especially drug-resistant TB, is a public health challenge in both civilian and penitentiary sectors worldwide. The Global End TB Strategy envisages specific measures to be taken by WHO Member States globally to tackle the problem and address the challenge. The WHO Regional Office for Europe has developed the TB Action Plan for 2016–2020 to achieve the milestones and objectives set by the Global End TB Strategy. This first compendium of best practices in TB control in prisons is an essential document for the implementation of the Strategy, providing examples of treatment and care following the recommendations proposed for WHO and its partners."

All the best,
Masoud

Replies

 

Marguerite Massinga Loembe Replied at 12:26 AM, 25 Jan 2018

Dear Dr Massoud


Man thanks for sharing this great ressource. I noticed it draws on experience and lesssons learnt not only from European countries, but also beyond, giving this document a global relevance.

Might we hope that it will also be available in other langages eventually ?

Best regards

Marguerite

Centre de Recherches Médicales de Lambaréné (CERMEL), Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Gabon

Stephen Muleshe Replied at 3:02 AM, 25 Jan 2018

Dear Masoud
Many thanks for sharing


Rgds

__________________________________________________
Dr. Stephen K. Muleshe
National TB, Leprosy and Lung Disease Program
Ministry of Health, Kenya
Mobile:+254-722433436/+254-736403421
Email: <> /
Skype: stephen.muleshe

Svetlana Doltu Replied at 3:12 AM, 25 Jan 2018

Congratulations!
It is very important to analyse and promote the good activities in prison
health, especially communicable diseases!

*Best regards, **Svetlana Doltu*

Regina Bhebhe Replied at 5:22 AM, 25 Jan 2018

Dear Masoud

Thank you for affording us this opportunity to have such kind of
information, it will surely go a long way to assist and help the
prison services health care workers in doing their best implementing
and caring for the prisoners in some such daring environments. I will
definitely share with the prison services guys.

Hala Jassim AlMossawi Replied at 11:54 PM, 31 Jan 2018

Thanks Masoud for sharing this reference. Very useful!
With incidence of Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) rising in many areas, particularly in the 10 NAP countries, MDR TB poses one of the greatest threats to TB control worldwide in various settings, including corrective facilities. Having these practices and guidance in place is important, however providers adherence to guidelines is critical. Evidence-based standards and guidelines are vital to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the care that health systems deliver. Best practices are crucial to ensure a reference point for assessing provider or system performance and quality of care.
In 2013, TB CARE II developed comprehensive handbook on Quality Improvement for TB and MDR-TB Programs. We understand that having explicit standards and guidelines helps ensure high-quality care, better health outcomes, and cost effective treatments. It is important to note, however, that adherence to these guidelines is not just a result of the development and dissemination of them, but of integrating the guidelines as part of a quality management program.
In most cases, provider adherence to guidelines is not a problem of individual performance, but rather a problem located in the health system itself. For guidelines to be effective, they need to be accompanied by improvements at every level of health systems – including political, health services, community, and patient. Research has shown that there are multiple causal factors influencing providers’ adherence to guidelines. These include: providers’ insufficient knowledge reference of TB management; greater focus on training and support to government providers while limited efforts are put on integrating private providers in the TB service provision; and policies and TB guidelines that sometimes fail to include the management of MDR TB, and pediatric TB, or coordination of services between programs such as TB-HIV, TB-Diabetes, and TB-MNCH, etc.
assessments conducted by TB CARE II in Bangladesh, Zambia, and Kenya to investigate factors influencing provider adherence to evidence-based TB guidelines and standards highlighted numerous factors that affected adherence (please visit www.tbcare2.org for more details about these studies).

Hala Jassim AlMossawi Replied at 12:08 AM, 1 Feb 2018

Thanks Masoud for sharing these guidelines! Very Useful!
With incidence of Multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) rising in many areas, particularly in the 10 NAP countries, MDR TB poses one of the greatest threats to TB control worldwide in various settings, including correctional facilities. Having these practices and guidance in place is important, however providers adherence to guidelines is critical. Evidence-based standards and guidelines are vital to improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the care that health systems deliver. Best practices are crucial to ensure a reference point for assessing provider or system performance and quality of care.
In 2013, TB CARE II developed comprehensive handbook on Quality Improvement for TB and MDR-TB Programs. We understand that having explicit standards and guidelines helps ensure high-quality care, better health outcomes, and cost effective treatments. It is important to note, however, that adherence to these guidelines is not just a result of the development and dissemination of them, but of integrating the guidelines as part of a quality management program.
In most cases, provider adherence to guidelines is not a problem of individual performance, but rather a problem located in the health system itself. For guidelines to be effective, they need to be accompanied by improvements at every level of health systems – including political, health services, community, and patient. Research has shown that there are multiple causal factors influencing providers’ adherence to guidelines. These include: providers’ insufficient knowledge reference of TB management; greater focus on training and support to government providers while limited efforts are put on integrating private providers in the TB service provision; and policies and TB guidelines that sometimes fail to include the management of MDR TB, and pediatric TB, or coordination of services between programs such as TB-HIV, TB-Diabetes, and TB-MNCH, etc.
Assessments conducted by TB CARE II in Bangladesh, Zambia, and Kenya to investigate factors influencing provider adherence to evidence-based TB guidelines and standards highlighted numerous factors that affected adherence (please visit www.tbcare2.org for more details about these studies).

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