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What about patients with special needs such as deaf/mute patients?

Posted: 15 Nov, 2016   Recommendation: 1   Replies: 3

Dear Colleagues,

This is an interesting conversation especially since in communication, a message is only considered to have been effective once it is understood and elicits the desired action from the receiver.

 

In our work for cancer prevention through community education, we have been challenged to consider our advocacy messaging for patients and families of patients who are deaf mute or blind. They may be a minority, but they also have health needs too.

 

Can someone inform of any past work done that we can learn from?

 

Best regards all,

Benda

Replies

 

David Fetterolf Panelist Replied at 1:18 PM, 15 Nov 2016

Hey Brenda,

Stratus actually got it's start serving the deaf community with video remote American Sign Language! VRI is a fantastic solution for this population since it combines the immediacy of over-the-phone interpretation with the visual benefits of an onsite interpreter. Even if an onsite interpreter needs to be brought in, VRI offers a way to introduce patients and providers and explain that an onsite interpreter is on they way. We've always said that a combination of over-the-phone, video remote, and onsite interpretation is best practice for any language access solution, and the deaf population is a huge reason why VRI is so important.

In addition to serving the deaf community that utilizes ASL, we also staff video remote certified Deaf interpreters - for patients who may not be familiar with American Sign Language. Earlier this year we hosted a webinar explaining it further. (find it here: https://www.stratusvideo.com/introducing-cdi-interpreting-demand/).

We have found that the deaf community is very active on social media! Have you considered outreach on any of those platforms?

Amy Board Replied at 12:26 PM, 16 Nov 2016

I think this is an especially interesting question when it comes to deaf or mute patients who do not speak American Sign Language. In our community, we have resettled refugees who are deaf/mute from other countries, and their only method of communication is to use a form of sign language that is recognized by their family and community members but does not translate to ASL. In such circumstances, a trained interpreter has been required to communicate with the immediate family members about the patient's care, and then this has been explained to the patient by the family members. Obviously an opportunity to communicate directly with the patient without having to involve the family members would be ideal, but we are unaware of resources that would facilitate this when the deaf/mute patient does not understand ASL. I'm curious if this is something that other communities have encountered and if so, how they have responded.

Thomas Bauer Replied at 8:20 AM, 17 Nov 2016

I would love to get the communities thoughts on Benda Kithaka's question " In our work for cancer prevention through community education, we have been challenged to consider our advocacy messaging for patients and families of patients who are deaf mute or blind. They may be a minority, but they also have health needs too."

Has anyone found or in the process of finding solutions for this patient population?

This Expert Panel is Archived.

This Expert Panel is no longer active as of December 2018. Thanks to those who posted here and made this information available to others visiting the site.