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Lancet Global Health call to re-name NCDs - your chance to contribute

By Luke Allen | 17 Jan, 2017

Today's new issue of the Lancet Global Health invites suggestions for an alternative name for non-communicable diseases.

See the article here (http://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/langlo/PIIS2214-109X(17)30001-3.pdf)

This topic has been covered in GHD discussion pages before, please consider submitting a letter to the Lancet Global Health spelling out your ideas in response to the article above.

Attached resource:

Replies

 

Oleg Shvets Replied at 2:19 AM, 26 Jan 2017

I guess that name of these diseases is not a really important issue. Moreover, politicians in some countries just become familiar with the huge problem associated with NCDs

Suresh Shah Replied at 2:38 AM, 26 Jan 2017

We are more familiar with term NCD , so it should not be renamed.

Addisalem Titiyos Replied at 2:55 AM, 26 Jan 2017

Is good to hear politicians in some countries become familiar with the problem associated with NCD, for me what matters is not the name; do the politicians really give sense with the problem they are being familiar?

Addisalem Titiyos Replied at 2:56 AM, 26 Jan 2017

Is good to hear politicians in some countries become familiar with the problem associated with NCD, for me what matters is not the name; do the politicians really give sense with the problem they are being familiar?

Justin Zaman Replied at 10:32 AM, 26 Jan 2017

Interesting that I started this discussion in October and this has appeared in the Lancet by . I've long said it.. These are diseases of economic development due to the ageing population and behavioural changes caused by modern living, in contrast to the infectious diseases of the pre-industrial world. However I'm not sure there's any mileage in lumping them together anymore having been in this field for almost two decades. . In fact given that the NCD global health community has failed at stemming the epidemic what with rising levels of obesity and diabetes for example, I don't even know why people are still pretending that global NCD health protection is even working. Better focus on eradicating true global poverty, ameliorating inequity and reducing global terrorism and conflict. NCD simply needs everyone to stop smoking and putting on excess weight. Pretty much that's it.

Erin Little Replied at 5:31 PM, 26 Jan 2017

Respectfully I could not disagree with you more Justin.

From a global perspective NCDs are growing fastest in the poor, not the rich. The poor are continuously trapped in a cycle of poverty as a result of their NCD: many unable to work, lacking access to the medication they need, and having solid general practitioners rather than expensive specialists who understand the management of these conditions.

As a patient myself, I implore you to reflection on your overt discrimination labeling all people as "overweight smokers" rather than human beings.

I can also assure you- Luke, like many professionals within our domain, has also been dedicated to shedding light on the naming issue and this is not a new idea started by you or any one of us. Let's celebrate his success in getting this attention that it deserves. Congrats, Luke.

Justin Zaman Replied at 5:52 PM, 26 Jan 2017

The comment was written provocatively to stimulate discussion, not argument. Discrimination? Excess weight is driven by economic development, this happens in rich and poor countries, in rich and poor people. Modern living is equally rural India nowadays. [1] Smoking is universally more prevalent in the poor, in rich and poor countries.

These are population-level risk factors as well as patient-level. The causes are environmental, not personal. Social determinants such as income distribution or education level indirectly impact on cardiovascular health. Social stratification influences biologic and behavioural cardiovascular risk factors, living conditions, psychosocial status and the health social system. People make choices about their behaviour (smoking, physical inactivity, etc) according to the opportunities offered by the society. The widespread urbanisation that is part and parcel of economic development is associated with an increased uptake of sedentary habits and high-fat diets – all risk factors for cardiovascular disease – and a resulting change in disease patterns. The process of economic development has led to lots of great things (less infectious disease, more affluence, better healthcare, advanced technology) but embedded within are the seeds of cardiovascular disease. This is the paradox: economic development worldwide improves health, yet the negative effects of globalisation contribute to widening disparities in health. This affects populations, not individuals.

The point I was making was that Murray and Lopez projected in 1999 that non-communicable disease mortality would increase from 28•1 million deaths in 1990 to 49•7 million in 2020.[2] Of 56 million global deaths in 2012, 38 million, or 68%, were due to noncommunicable diseases. [3].

Heart disease is not primarily an individual responsibility, but rather socially patterned and reinforced in groups. To reduce heart disease, we need to take into account the role that the broader social and physical environment have on it. We are all failing on this. Having been in the field this long, a passionate NCD epidemiologic teacher and clinical academic practitioner of the Rose population-level model, it is depressing.

1. Zaman MJ, Patel A, Jan S, Hillis G, Raju K, Neal B, Chow C. Socioeconomic distribution of cardiovascular risk factors and knowledge in rural India. Int. J. Epidemiology 2012; Feb 16
2. Lancet. Volume 349, No. 9064, p1498–1504, 24 May 1997
3. http://www.who.int/gho/ncd/mortality_morbidity/en

Erin Little Replied at 7:20 PM, 26 Jan 2017

I appreciate and welcome your thoughts. I agree it is often depressing but I am optimistic given our opportunity with the massive work we have at hand. There is no way out but through and must believe in the best, not worst case scenarios. We must never give up hope. I also encourage you to consider the following below.

I swear to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, this covenant:

I will respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk, and gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow.

I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures which are required, avoiding those twin traps of overtreatment and therapeutic nihilism.

I will remember that there is art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon's knife or the chemist's drug.

I will not be ashamed to say "I know not," nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed for a patient's recovery.

I will respect the privacy of my patients, for their problems are not disclosed to me that the world may know. Most especially must I tread with care in matters of life and death. If it is given me to save a life, all thanks. But it may also be within my power to take a life; this awesome responsibility must be faced with great humbleness and awareness of my own frailty. Above all, I must not play at God.

I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person's family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick.

I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure.

I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm.

If I do not violate this oath, may I enjoy life and art, respected while I live and remembered with affection thereafter. May I always act so as to preserve the finest traditions of my calling and may I long experience the joy of healing those who seek my help.

1- Lasagna L, 1964.

Mengistu Tadesse Replied at 5:26 AM, 30 Jan 2017

Non infectious Disease Burden[NIDB] , will be appropriate Re-naming for non communicable Disease with the fact of its spectrum and Pandemicty across the glob in every sociology- status class. it will also creates awareness to Programmer to address the NID burden with the context of pandemic senario.

Mengistu Tadesse Replied at 5:26 AM, 30 Jan 2017

Non infectious Disease Burden[NIDB] , will be appropriate Re-naming for non communicable Disease with the fact of its spectrum and Pandemicty across the glob in every sociology- status class. it will also creates awareness to Programmer to address the NID burden with the context of pandemic senario.

This Community is Archived.

This community is no longer active as of December 2018. Thanks to those who posted here and made this information available to others visiting the site.