Nursing and the Harvard-LSHTM Independent Panel on the Global Response to Ebola

By Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus | 24 Nov, 2015

This is letter that I intend to send to The Lancet:

On Sunday, the Harvard-LSHTM Independent Panel on the Global Response to Ebola issued a report in The Lancet suggesting reforms to avoid repetition of a similar disaster in the future. The “interdisciplinary” panel did not see fit to include any members with a background in nursing despite the vital role of our profession in the global response, our knowledge of operational aspects of public health, and the ongoing sacrifices those in nursing have made at the front lines of the outbreak.

Respectfully, who speaks now for the nurses in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea, the United States, Europe, and the African Union who cared for those with Ebola? Who speaks for the nurses whose lives were sometimes placed at risk during the outbreak through the hubris of politicians, administrators, and, yes, physicians?

When the policy makers, researchers, and high level clinicians are gone, there will still be nurses serving in remote posts in Central and West Africa, placing their lives at risk for Ebola, HIV, and Tuberculosis for want of masks, goggles, gloves, bleach, or, simply, running water.

 If we wish to avoid a scenario similar to the current West African Ebola outbreak, there must be a radical shift in how we approach global health policy. The old, failed hierarchies must be abolished and new voices must enter the discussion. There is no longer any excuse which can justify the omission of our profession. Therefore, to move towards enduring change, members from nursing, the largest single professional health care cadre on the planet, must be included from the very beginning in all policy design and reforms.

Replies

 

Elizabeth Anne Jones Replied at 2:49 AM, 24 Nov 2015

Elizabeth, thank you for advocating for our profession, and especially for those, nationals and internationals, in the trenches in developing countries. They are the unsung heroes, and they have the intimate knowledge of "on the ground" healthcare that is needed to develop effective policy change and preventative measures. I am constantly aggrieved by the way I see my nurse colleagues treated and ignored. There is a sad lack of respect and recognition. When will it be acknowledged that the base of the healthcare pyramid is a strong and supported nursing workforce. It is a crumbling structure without our professional expertise.

Elizabeth Anne Jones BSN, CPN
Rwanda

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 12:16 PM, 24 Nov 2015

Dear Elizabeth Anne,
We can do something; we have our numbers, if nothing else, then let's use that. If you agree with the letter then please cut and past the content, add you own name and contact information, and then email it to the following people:

Corresponding author:
Dr Suerie Moon


Editor: Richard Horton


Deputy Editor: Astrid James

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 12:34 PM, 24 Nov 2015

Here is revised template using the emails for ( Dr Suerie Moon); (Dr Peter Piot); ( Dr Richard Horton); (Dr Astrid James) :

Dear Dr. Moon, Dr. Piot, Dr. Horton, and Dr. James,

On Sunday, the Harvard-LSHTM Independent Panel on the Global Response to Ebola issued a report in The Lancet suggesting reforms to avoid repetition of a similar disaster in the future. From all appearances, the “interdisciplinary” panel did not see fit to include any members with a background in nursing or midwifery despite our vital role in the global response, our knowledge of operational aspects of public health, and the ongoing sacrifices those in nursing have made at the front lines of the outbreak.

Respectfully, who speaks now for the nurses in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea, the United States, Europe, and the African Union who cared for those with Ebola? Who speaks for the nurses and midwives whose lives were sometimes placed at risk through the hubris of politicians, administrators, and, yes, physicians that underestimated the extent of the outbreak?

When the policy makers, researchers, and high level clinicians are gone, there will still be nurses serving in remote posts in Central and West Africa, placing their lives at risk for Ebola, HIV, and Tuberculosis for want of masks, goggles, gloves, bleach, or, simply, running water.

If we wish to avoid a scenario similar to the current West African Ebola outbreak, there must be a radical shift in how we approach global health policy. The old, failed hierarchies must be abolished and new voices must enter the discussion. There is no longer any excuse which can justify the omission of our profession. Therefore, to move towards enduring change, expert members from nursing, the largest single professional health care cadre on the planet, must be included from the very beginning in all policy design and reforms.


Sincerely,

Mary Dahl Maher Replied at 9:23 PM, 24 Nov 2015

Wonderfully written. Thank you for your articulate response.

Mary Dahl Maher, PhD, MPH, CNM, ARNP
Associate Professor
Nursing Department
Director, Public Health Program

Annie Mead Replied at 11:33 PM, 24 Nov 2015

Thank you Elizabeth for advocating and inspiring others to do the same. It's a well-written letter and your leadership is much appreciated.

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 11:51 PM, 24 Nov 2015

Thanks for the lovely words, but what I would like most is for everyone to send a letter . If you don't feel comfortable with my template, then please write one in your own words and let us know what you said. But speak up!

Elizabeth Anne Jones Replied at 5:28 AM, 25 Nov 2015

I have written and sent my appeal in support of nursing to the individuals whose email addresses you supplied. I sincerely hope we can effect change by standing up and being vocal.
Thankyou for initiating the call to action

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 2:42 AM, 7 Dec 2015

There are several nurses that are interested in signing on to the letter to The Lancet for submission to their formal process to be considered for publication. However, we think that it be best to have many nurses sign on if we are going to make a difference.

Who else is willing to sign on?


Before you consider that the time has passed to respond, I would also like to mention the Edx course on Ebola being run by Dr Ashish Jha , who is Director of the Harvard Institute for Global Health (HIGH) and was a leader of the joint Harvard-LSHTM Independent Panel. GHDonline is affiliated with HIGH.

Having seen the syllabus, it looks like an interesting course however....
While there are two Professors of Law, one from the US and one from the UK, included on the faculty, there is not a single nurse included. Given that nurses have been the providers that have carried the burden of care in the most effected countries and will play an essential role in health care strengthening going into the future , it is frankly astounding that nursing experts were omitted.

When I bring up nursing, I am usually informed that they do not know who to invite, so a very brief search easily gives me four nurses that were either active in the response or have extensive experience about health service delivery in one of the affected countries, and no doubt have the experience, commitment, and capacity to make this a better course.

And it shows that our perspective is summarily ignored by those that are trying to influence the post Ebola response. Let's work together to heighten their awareness.

Join me in placing your name on a formal letter to submit to Lancet for possible publication.

Elizabeth Anne Jones Replied at 5:02 AM, 7 Dec 2015

Where do I sign ? I am totally in support of this important initiative to promote the efficacy and indespensibility of nurses everywhere. Thankyou for making it visible.

Judy Phillips Replied at 5:57 AM, 7 Dec 2015

Elizabeth,
I will join in helping. Thank you!
Judy Phillips

Monique Germain Moderator Replied at 11:22 AM, 7 Dec 2015

I will too. Thanks, Elizabeth. This will help nurses.

Ruth McDermott-Levy Replied at 7:49 PM, 7 Dec 2015

Dear Elizabeth,
You may place my name on the letter. Thank you for your efforts.
Ruth McDermott-Levy, PhD, MPH, RN

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 10:25 PM, 7 Dec 2015

Dear Ruth,
Thanks. I very much appreciate and value your participation.

Elizabeth

Pat Daoust Replied at 10:32 PM, 7 Dec 2015

Elizabeth, pls add my signature.

Pat Daoust RN MSN FAAN
Director of Nursing
MGH Global Health

Karen A Wolf Replied at 11:00 PM, 7 Dec 2015

Please add my name:

Karen Anne Wolf PhD, CRNP, DFNAP
Associate Professor
Pennsylvania State University- College of Nursing/World Campus

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 11:51 PM, 7 Dec 2015

Thank you to everyone that has responded so far. I have also sent a private email out to some nurses that are not on ghdonline. Once I hear back from them , I will post the letter here for one last check to assure names and affiliations etc. are correct before I submit it.
If anyone has a line to nurses in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, or Uganda and DCR Congo ( all countries affected by Ebola) can you please see if any of your fellow nurses there wish to sign on?

Elizabeth

Sharon Brownie Replied at 12:06 AM, 8 Dec 2015

Hello Elizabeth .. you posted a question today asking for anyone with links to Uganda. I have just commenced as Dean Nursing & Midwifery for the Aga Khan University School of Nursing & Midwifery East Africa. We have a campus and vibrant nursing programmes which I oversee in Uganda. I would be happy to connect. Sharon

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 2:40 AM, 8 Dec 2015

Wonderful! And congratulations on your position as Dean.

Elizabeth

Jeanne Leffers Replied at 5:53 AM, 8 Dec 2015

Hello Elizabeth, Please add my name as well.

Jeanne Leffers, PhD, RN, FAAN
Professor Emeritus
University of Massachusetts Dartmouth

Sheila Davis Moderator Emeritus Replied at 8:54 AM, 8 Dec 2015

Please add my name-- thanks Elizabeth for your advocacy

Sheila Davis, DNP, ANP, FAAN
Chief Nursing Officer
Chief of Ebola Response
Partners In Health

Meseret Desta Haileyesus(SMW,BSC,MPH) Replied at 9:10 AM, 8 Dec 2015

Thanks Elizabeth,
I will join. Thanks

Joanne Pohl Replied at 11:08 AM, 8 Dec 2015

Please add my name as well. Thank you!
Joanne

--



*Joanne M. Pohl, PhD, ANP-BC, FAAN, FAANPProfessor EmeritaThe University of
MichiganSchool of Nursing*
*President, Haiti Nursing Foundation Board*


*​www.haitinursing.org <http://www.haitinursing.org> ​734-274-1107

Annie Mead Replied at 8:24 PM, 8 Dec 2015

I'd like to join the list. Thanks all for your work on this.

Ann Mead, RN, MPH
Clinical Nurse Cardiac Surgery
Washington, DC

Andy Michaels Replied at 7:26 AM, 9 Dec 2015

Elizabeth,

please add my name to folks who support your letter - i do, strongly...

thanks,
Andy Michaels, MD, MPH, FACS

Andrea Sonenberg Replied at 7:36 AM, 9 Dec 2015

Elizabeth,
Please include me in the list of supporters for this. Thank you for your advocacy.

Andréa Sonenberg, PhD, WHNP, CNM-BC, FNAP
Faculty Policy Fellow, AACN
Associate Professor
Pace University

International Faculty
Promoting Health in Haiti

Atussa Ghahreman Replied at 7:58 AM, 9 Dec 2015

Dear Elizabeth,

Please count me in as I do strongly support this action.

Elizabeth Downes Replied at 9:36 AM, 9 Dec 2015

Thank yo for calling attention to this! Sign me up. Below is the text of the email I sent to Dr. Moon, Dr. Piot, Dr. Horton, and Dr. James:
The lack of inclusion of nursing on the Independent Panel on Global Response to Ebola is a serious oversight. I fully support the call for a "radical shift in how we approach global health policy" as stated in the letter by Sheila Davis, the CNO of Partners in Health. I have worked alongside frontline nurses in Liberia, Benin, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, and Fiji, among other places, and I am saddened by the impact of policies made far from and without input from those most affected. Nurses are continually affected by decisions taken without their input. Nurses must be included not only policy and decision making to avoid the repetition of the tragic Ebola out break in West Africa, but to improve health throughout the world. Efforts to affect changes in health systems will be weakened without the inclusion and preparation of this key cadre. Vertical programs place stress on poorly supported health workers and rarely take into account the full picture of those working on the front lines. Nurses must be seen as more than tools for implementing programs designed without their input.
I have joined the GHD online network and look forward to hearing more about efforts to include nursing in these important efforts.
Sincerely,
Elizabeth

Elizabeth A. Downes, DNP, MPH, CNE, FAANP, ANEF
Associate Clinical Professor
Family Nurse Practitioner, NP-C
Consultant, Carter Center
Peace Corps Coverdell Fellows Program Coordinator
Family Nurse Practitioner Program Co-coordinator
Emory University
404-727-1544

Jennifer Foster Replied at 10:14 AM, 9 Dec 2015

Thank you for this important and well articulted letter, and I, too,would like to be signatory to it. Even though my work is in Latin America and the Caribbean, the absence of nurses and midwives at global policy tables in this part of the world is similar. The Ebola crisis has placed nursing and midwifery absence in high relief, but health services everywhere rely on us, and too often our work, our knowledge, our contributions remain invisible.

Jennifer Foster, PhD, MPH, CNM, FACNM
Associate Clinical Professor
Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
Emory University
Atlanta, GA 30322 USA

Mary Ellen Galante Replied at 2:24 PM, 9 Dec 2015

Dear Elizabeth,

Thank you for your powerfully written letter, I would like to add my name.

Mary Ellen Galante, CNM, MSN, MPH

Deborah Goldman Replied at 3:12 PM, 9 Dec 2015

Elizabeth, thank you for initiating this strong statement. Please add my name.

Deborah Goldman CNM, ARNP, MPH

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 3:48 PM, 9 Dec 2015

Thanks Mary Ellen

Monique Germain Moderator Replied at 6:01 PM, 9 Dec 2015

Way to go!

Jeanne Leffers Replied at 6:39 PM, 9 Dec 2015

Looks good Elizabeth--thanks for getting this together--Jeanne

Sheila Davis Moderator Emeritus Replied at 6:50 PM, 9 Dec 2015

Thanks Elizabeth for your leadership with this.

Sent from my iPhone, please excuse the brevity of this message.

Andrea Sonenberg Replied at 7:06 PM, 9 Dec 2015

Elizabeth, Thank You for taking the initiative on this; for writing a strong, eloquent letter; and for inviting the rest of us to be cosigners.
~Andrea

Ruth McDermott-Levy Replied at 7:13 PM, 9 Dec 2015

Hi, Elizabeth,
Sorry I did not give you my affiliation etc. for the excellent letter in support of nursing that you composed.
Ruth McDermott-Levy, PhD, MPH, RN
Associate Professor & Director, Center of Global & Public Health
College of Nursing, Villanova University
Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA

Paula Matarrese Replied at 7:17 PM, 9 Dec 2015

I will also sign

Brittney Sullivan Replied at 7:22 PM, 9 Dec 2015

As will I - thank you!

Brittney Sullivan, MS, RN, CPNP
PhD Student
Duke University School of Nursing
Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Future of Nursing Scholar

dian marandola Replied at 7:53 PM, 9 Dec 2015

Thank you all for this great response. I would like to add my name to the signatures

Dian Traisci-Marandola DNP, APRN, MPH, BC-NP
Consultant - Public Health Associates - US
International Alliance for Children- advocate

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 8:07 PM, 9 Dec 2015

okay, I will fix that

Barbara Dehn Replied at 8:13 PM, 9 Dec 2015

HI Elizabeth,
How do I sign?

Barb Dehn RN MS NP, FAANP, NCMP
Lecturer, Stanford University Physician Assistant Program
Founder & CEO Blue Orchid Press

Atussa Ghahreman Replied at 8:45 PM, 9 Dec 2015

Dear Elizabeth,

Thanks one more time for your support and follow up.
I have noticed a few details are missing from my profile which have been
corrected promptly.
It would be appreciated if you could kindly edit/ update my signature.
In order to make it easier, you can find the correct infos mentioned here.

Atussa Ghahreman, RN, MHM, MIPH
Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières
Sydney, Australia.


Thanks in Advance.

Atussa Gh

Joanne Pohl Replied at 9:32 PM, 9 Dec 2015

Wonderful!!

Joanne M. POHL, PhD, APRN-BC, FAAN, FAANP
Professor Emeritus
The University of Michigan School of Nursing
734-274-1107 (c)
734-647-8570 (o)
734-647-0351 (f)

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 2:59 AM, 10 Dec 2015

http://ees.elsevier.com/thelancet/default.asp
Thank you for approving "Nursing's response to the Harvard-LSHTM Independent Panel on the Global Response to Ebola". An email has been sent to you confirming that the journal has received this submission. Your Co-Author(s) may also receive this email, depending on the journal policy.

Now we wait and see.

Joanne Pohl Replied at 7:19 AM, 10 Dec 2015

Thanks for taking the lead!!

Aimee Latta Replied at 10:25 AM, 10 Dec 2015

Is it too late to add my signature?

Aimee Latta, RN, MSc
Manager, Clinical Performance Improvement
Columbia University Medical Center

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 3:51 PM, 10 Dec 2015

Dear Aimee,
The letter was submitted last night. If am allowed to add on names, I will do so as I am still being contacted by nurses, such as yourself, asking to ask to sign on.
Sorry about that, but many thanks for your enthusiasm.
Regardless we need to continue to advocate for nurses to be included at the highest levels in post Ebola reform .
If we get no response from Lancet we can think about submitting to another forum.

Elizabeth

Elizabeth Anne Jones Replied at 1:38 AM, 11 Dec 2015

Dear Elizabeth. Many thanks for your blazing torch!!!

Elizabeth Anne Jones, BSN, CPN
Pediatric Nurse Mentor
CHUK University Teaching Hospital
Ministry of Health Rwanda
Human Resources for Health Program
phone: +250 783 943 426

*Gratitude turns what we have into* enough - Shakyamuni Buddha

*PEACE STARTS WITH A SMILE...Mother Theresa*

Jonathan Monis Replied at 2:03 AM, 11 Dec 2015

Hi Elizabeth.

I am for this initiative and would like to add my name. I also have a presentation tomorrow regarding the role of nurses in the achievement of Universal Health Coverage. Though not yet on its final form, can I cite some of the draft letter to Harvard to be shown to the participants (local nurses), for them to have an evidence of nurses clamoring to be recognized in the global policy discussion on health?

Hope you can revert the soonest.

Regards,

Jonathan Monis, RN, MSPH
Secretary General
Alliance of Young Nurse Leaders and Advocates

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 4:06 AM, 11 Dec 2015

Dear Jonathan,
As long as you cite the source , it is fine to use this.
If you could, please encourage the nurses to join GHDonline, too, as way to for us all to support one another.

Elizabeth

Denali Dahl Replied at 11:57 AM, 14 Dec 2015

Thank you for sharing this post. I am not a nurse but I agree that the nursing profession as a whole is largely overlooked, within the United States and other developed countries but also across the developing world. I agree that nurses need to become a focus of health care policy, especially with a shortage of physicians and a large part of providing health care being task shifted to nurses around the world. Nurses play a huge role in patient care and interaction with the families. With more attention and resources focused on the critical role of nurses in patient care, the quality of care received by each patient would drastically increase. Additionally the power of nurses as community health workers needs to be understood and recognized by health care policy makers.

Elizabeth Anne Jones Replied at 1:53 PM, 14 Dec 2015

Dear Denali,

Thank you so much for your recognition and insight regarding the role of
nurses in the improvement and delivery of quality healthcare worldwide.
Nurses are the base of the healthcare pyramid. Without us the whole system
will collapse.

In appreciation of your support

Elizabeth Anne Jones

Elizabeth Anne Jones, BSN, CPN
Pediatric Nurse Mentor
CHUK University Teaching Hospital
Ministry of Health Rwanda
Human Resources for Health Program
phone: +250 783 943 426

*Gratitude turns what we have into* enough - Shakyamuni Buddha

Maggie Sullivan Moderator Replied at 1:30 PM, 7 Jan 2016

Hello and Happy New Year, Elizabeth! As many have said before me, thank you for not only initiating, but seeing through, this effort. I think it's been about a month since the letter was submitted to the Lancet. Have you received any reply? You were also instrumental in the Lancet's Global Health Series appointment of a nurse to their editorial board. This thread is causing me to wonder about the impact of that change. I also wonder if there are certain strategies we could borrow from other social movements that foster incremental change (as opposed to a single 'token' nurse on any board that won't necessarily be able to effect change in isolation.

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 10:50 PM, 7 Jan 2016

Lancet Global Health is an open access journal under in the Lancet "family" but it is a separate publication with a different editor than The Lancet . What I can say is that a basic search on the Lancet Global Health site had papers in which truly interdisciplinary groups, nurses, physicians ,and public health experts, all sharing authorship. I have no idea why that is the case , but I am happy to see it.

A few of us have directly corresponded with the first author of the Ebola paper, with the editors of The Lancet being cc'd in the conversation. After a bit of back and forth, Dr Moon seemed open to more communication on the topic. I had wanted to arrange a meeting with her in which Anne Sliney, , Pat Doust, or Sheila Davis might be in attendance as well, but I have a had to push it back because of some immediate priorities. I do hope to contact Dr moon later in the winter to arrange a meeting, perhaps by that time all three West African countries will be Ebola free , allowing an opening for a West African nursing leader to also attend.

I think that the "leaders' in Global Health , such as Harvard and other major universities , can set an example by inviting health experts that are nurses on their panels, by being called to task when they fail to do so, both privately , at first ,and then we have to be willing to up the ante to calling them out in public, if need be.

We need to be sure of our facts before we start , and then know who to suggest as experts, if asked.

We need to push WHO to consider a nurse to head that organization and to have more nurses be in charge of areas/departments.

The people who start an initiative are not always the best people to follow through on it - so I might be good at making the first attempt but you, Maggie, might be better in dealing with the follow through. Which why we pool our resources, skills and time to offer to do what we are good at .

Nurses can do health related podcasts , and write for general publications with a broad reach.

I sometime wonder, what would happen if every nurse on the planet stopped their work for a single hour? We cannot do that for ethical reasons be we can put it out there as a thought experiment: If there were no doctors, or community health workers, or pharmacists, it would be bad, if there were no nurses it would be worse.

Finally this isn't about getting points, it is about sharing our expertise and experience working in conjunction with our colleagues in medicine, pharmacy, public health, and basic sciences to improve health policy, programs, and planning to improve health outcomes for all the populations we serve.

Support each other no matter how we entered the profession, what area we work in or what nursing qualification/degree that we have. We are all nurses.

Monique Germain Moderator Replied at 3:16 PM, 8 Jan 2016

Well saide, Elizabeth!
Nurses are at the gateway of achieving positive health outcomes.

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 3:25 PM, 8 Jan 2016

Monique what would you do to raise the visibility of nurses, to have us be at the fore in policy design and implementation?
(Frankly, my spine is sore from being the "backbone" of healthcare.)

Elizabeth

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 3:45 PM, 8 Jan 2016

Hey! Look what came in the mail today!

I have to decide about primary authors, we are only allowed 5. The remaining contributors would be listed in an appendix.

It is important to include some of the nursing leaders from West Africa . I also want to include the two nursing leaders that facilitated contact with our colleagues in West Africa. Everyone else would be in the appendix. For those that signed on , would this be acceptable to you?


Manuscript reference number: THELANCET-D-15-08711
Title: Nursing's response to the Harvard-LSHTM Independent Panel on the Global Response to Ebola

Dear Ms. Glaser,

I am pleased to tell you that your Correspondence letter has been accepted for publication in The Lancet. You will receive a proof by email in the next few weeks, which should be checked and returned within 2 working days.

Please note that as per our instructions to authors, correspondence submissions may have only 5 authors. Five of the authors may be named on behalf of the remaining authors, whose names can be listed in an appendix.

(I deleted some extra administrative details)



Best wishes,

Audrey Ceschia
Senior Editor
The Lancet

Susan Driscoll Replied at 11:21 AM, 9 Jan 2016

That is wonderful news! Thank you so much for your work in this. I wish
that we could put all the West African nurses as authors of this
letter...they deserve all the kudos.
Again, thank you and yes your plan seems appropriate.
Susan Driscoll MPH, MSN, ANP

Deborah Wilson Replied at 10:50 AM, 10 Jan 2016

Congratulations Elizabeth! This is awesome and well deserved.
Also your letter was excellent I do hope Lancet publishes it.
Thank you
Debbie

Jeanne Leffers Replied at 9:12 PM, 10 Jan 2016

Thank you Elizabeth for this initiative and congratulations for getting this published. Obviously you and other nurses who worked directly with the Ebola response should be the primary authors!

Karen A Wolf Replied at 9:42 PM, 10 Jan 2016

Wonderful to know that the letter is accepted. Inclusion of Nurses is such an important point to make. Our unity globally is essential and I concur that voice from West Africa is essential as well. I agree with Jeanne that the five authors should include yourself and other nurses who worked directly in the response to Ebola.

Sharon Brownie Replied at 9:50 PM, 10 Jan 2016

Congratulations. This is a very important discussion and the critical role undertaken my nurses and midwives across Africa should be highlighted more frequently as it is so often not fully understood. Sharon

Dani Kloepper Replied at 11:31 PM, 10 Jan 2016

Elizabeth,

Thank you so much for your leadership and congratulations to all! As someone who has spent the last year in Sierra Leone within the Ebola response, I cannot tell you how I've ached to see nurses receive the recognition they deserve. ALL of the nurses in West Africa are heroes. The sacrifices the local nurses made are especially incomprehensible. I am beyond thankful there is a light at the end of the tunnel. Being apart of this response has been one of the greatest honors of my life and I would not trade the highs, lows, aches, pains and joy for anything. I am so proud to call all of you colleague!

Dani Kloepper

Ana Mejia Replied at 9:49 AM, 11 Jan 2016

Fantastic work!! As someone who is trying to get involved in global work and looking to one day impact our global community Elizabeth and all involved have been extremely inspirational and great role models. Thank you!!


---Ms. Ana Carolina Mejia



magically sent from my iPhone

Mary Ellen Galante Replied at 12:10 PM, 11 Jan 2016

As one of the signers, I would very much want those who worked on the Ebola
response directly to appear in print as the primary signers of the letter.
The appendix is fine for me.

I congratulate you on the writing of such a powerful letter and hope its
publication sends some big ripples (waves even :).

Best of luck as you finish your dissertation and defense Elizabeth.

Elizabeth Downes Replied at 1:17 PM, 11 Jan 2016

Congratulations! I agree with your suggestion to include West African nurses among the 5 authors. Marian Subah is a tremendous leader among nurses in Liberia. I know the nurses working with Partners in Health also took on great leadership during and now, after, the crisis to strengthen the health care/human resources.
Thank you for YOUR leadership in this!
Best regards,
Elizabeth

Andrea Sonenberg Replied at 2:24 PM, 11 Jan 2016

Elizabeth,
Congratulations on your leadership and success on having nurses' voices heard! You have been a wonderful steward on this and other incredibly important dialogues and initiatives. I too agree that those directly involved in the Ebola efforts should be among the 5 authors, especially the nurses from West Africa and those of you who went over to support them. So proud to be engaged and inspired by such a heroic group of nurses & midwives...

Best regards,
~Andrea

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 3:57 PM, 11 Jan 2016

Each person here , no matter where you are, has the capacity to advocate for nursing.
Use your best asset. While my strength is in using the spoken and written word, some of you are good bringing together various actors to collaborate, some set examples through consistent clinical excellence, others through quality management, and still others through training and instilling values in the next general of nurses.

Think about how you can contribute , plan carefully, and then act, it makes a difference!

Elizabeth

alice werbel Replied at 11:57 AM, 12 Jan 2016

re nurses & Ebola care:
The attached article appearing in the current Journal of Pediatrics is an excellent example of the kind of teamwork nurses seek and contribution nurses make. It represents a collaboration with Medical Director in Sierra Leone hospital, nurse Tracy Kelly and physician colleagues.

Attached resource:

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 12:04 PM, 12 Jan 2016

Dear Alice,
thanks for posting the paper; this is a very good example of interdisciplinary collaboration to improve patient care.

Elizabeth

Abubakar Danlami Balarabe Replied at 1:43 PM, 12 Jan 2016

blockquote, div.yahoo_quoted { margin-left: 0 !important; border-left:1px #715FFA solid !important; padding-left:1ex !important; background-color:white !important; } Dear Elizabeth,
This is a very good and encouraging news, thank you for the leadership. Please, when the publication is printed out alert we in West Africa so that we can make our purchase order in good time. 
Best regards,Abubakar Danlami Balarabe RN, RPN.


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 2:59 PM, 12 Jan 2016

Maybe you can get a copy of the letter is it appears in the journal
emailed to you from a friend to save the purchase price. :)

Elizabeth Glaser Moderator Emeritus Replied at 12:20 AM, 27 Feb 2016

Our letter was just published in The Lancet.
They only allowed 5 people's names up front for the main page, but _everyone_ all 58 of you that signed on are listed in the supplement that is attached.
As the epidemic wanes, please don't forget our colleagues in West Africa; while things are slowly getting better, the conditions that contributed to the outbreak are still very much in evidence and health care providers in Liberia, Sierra Leone ,and Guinea will need support for strengthening their health system for quite some time...
We need to do more than write letters , we have to act to make change, to step up to lead, but this is a good place to start.
Thank you for all participating .

Elizabeth

Attached resource:

Pat Daoust Replied at 7:29 AM, 27 Feb 2016

Great job Elizabeth! Thank you for taking the lead on this effort.

Pat Daoust MSN RN FAAN

Melissa Cox Replied at 9:43 AM, 27 Feb 2016

This is excellent!

Monique Germain Moderator Replied at 1:51 AM, 28 Feb 2016

Thank you!

Monique Germain Moderator Replied at 1:52 AM, 28 Feb 2016

Thank you!

Hartley Feld Replied at 7:34 AM, 28 Feb 2016

Thank you so much, really appreciate all that you do for global health nursing! Hartley Feld

Dr Shanta Ghatak Replied at 8:52 PM, 28 Feb 2016

Hi Elizabeth
I am so sorry I had limited access to the internet while I was working as a FMT doctor and clinical trainer and mobile outreach co ordinator in West Africa last year .....I think I have missed this unique opportunity where I could have provided with great moments ...photos and all
Shanta

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